General

How can I request a catalogue? MC

Q1.How can I request a catalogue? 

Answer. You can pick up a catalogue in your local Mothercare store
If  you love Mothercare products, why not join our mailing list? We will keep you up to date with our latest promotions and events so you'll never miss our deals.
To sign-up for our mailing list simply click here to create an account on mothercare.pk and check the box to receive news and offers from Mothercare.

Up to what age is an infant carrier suitable?

The age of your child is not important - it is their weight which matters when choosing a car seat. Infant carriers are suitable from birth to approximately 13kg/29lb. View our online range here

What delivery options do you offer?

We offer Standard delivery . Standard delivery is charged at PKR 100 - 320 for orders below Rs.2500/- and is currently free on orders over Rs.2500/- . We will deliver all stocked items within 4 - 5 working days*. All our deliveries are made Monday to Saturday. Please note that geographical restrictions apply to some of our delivery options.

Can I track my order online?

To track your order, view recent orders and see your order history. Log in to our website and click on 'my account' at the top of the page. Click on the link 'view recent orders'. This will show you your order history. Select order you wish to view. If you have received a dispatch of order email then please copy your tracking number and track you order on the couriers website. Unfortunately, we are unable to specify a day or time for delivery. If you are not home when we attempt to deliver, the courier will re-attempt delivery and will call you to arrange a more convenient day for delivery.

What would be the best type of pushchair to take on holiday?

A lightweight, compact stroller. One that has an umbrella style fold, so that it is convenient to transport. A shopping basket is always handy for storing toys, suncream and other holiday essentials. Plus, don't forget to get a sunshade or parasol too. View our online range of strollers and buggies here

I've received my order, but it's not suitable. How do I return it?

Mothercare is dedicated to offering the highest levels of quality and service. We will be happy to refund or exchange any item(s)* that you are not completely satisfied with, as long as they are returned in an unused condition and in their original packaging, within 14 days of receipt with proof of purchase. Most items can be returned to any Mothercare store or may be sent direct to us at: Mothercare, TEAM A VENTURES WAREHOUSE, Shed # D8, Plot # S1, Sector # 7, Road # 4000, Korangi Industrial Area - After contacting our customer service team at support@mothercare.pk

Do you deliver overseas?

We don't offer International Delivery.

When's the best time to toilet train?

There is a very broad age spectrum of when children are out of nappies and these days it really doesn't matter if your child is not 'dry' before 3 years. It is up to you and your child to decide when to start toilet-training. However, the actual transition from nappies to pants can be traumatic for a child and it is important you do not become impatient with your child. Many nurseries and playgroups insist your child is dry during the day before he is offered a place, although some daycare nurseries are more flexible. It is now known that babies are unable to control their bowel and bladder before 18 to 24 months, and often it can be much later.

I can’t log on to my account, what should I do?

If you have an existing account with us and have forgotten your password please click the 'sign in / register' link at the top of the page. Under 'Sign in to your account' please enter your email address click the 'forgotten your password?' link. We will then send you an email with instructions to reset your password. If you don't receive your password reset email within 1 hour please check your spam folder. If the email is not in your spam folder please request another one.

How can I update my personal information?

To update or change your personal information please log-in to mothercare.pk using the 'sign in / register' link at the top of the page. If you are already signed in please click the 'my account' link at the top of the page. Then select 'my details and contact preferences'. From this section you may view and amend your details including choosing how you would like us to contact you.

Can I change my payment information?

Once an order has been placed we are unable to change your payment information. By default we do not store any payment information on our systems. If you have opted to save your card details while placing an order with us you may view or remove these details by clicking the 'my account' link at the top of the page and then selecting 'payment card details'.

Can you help with a query I have on my electrical item?

Please see below a list of hints and tips on selected electrical products which should help resolve any queries you may come across. Angelcare Monitor (D1499) Avent Bottle & Food Warmer (N0600) Avent Digital Steam Steriliser (K5612) Avent SCD520 Baby Monitor (G1331) Avent SCD530 Baby Monitor (G1332) Avent Single Electronic Pump (N0603) Beaba Baby Cook (N0829) Birdy Breezer (S0764) Gro Egg Thermometer (B5987) Mothercare No Fill Steriliser (A3210) Medela Harmony Breast Pump (G1284) Medela Mini Electric Breast Pump (A2806) Medela Swing Pump (A0342) Mothercare Battery guidelines NSDCM 5018 Digital Camera (G1334) Pre Natal Heart Monitor (T2202) Secure & Sleep Monitor (K2588) Sensory Select Bouncer (J6986) Tommee Tippee Electric Breast Pump (K2565) Tommee Tippee Electric Steriliser (K0639) Tommee Tippee Suresound Deluxe Monitor (X1616) Tommee Tippee Suresound Ultimate Monitor (X1615) General Hints and Tips Guide including contact numbers for manufacturers.

Can I change my delivery address?

You may update your mothercare address book by clicking the 'my account' link at the top of the page and selecting 'address book', from here you can add, remove and amend your addresses. If you have already placed an order changes made in this area will not alter the delivery details. Once an order has been placed it is often not possible for us to change the delivery address. We are happy however to look at this on a case by case basis and if possible we are happy to update delivery details for you. Please contact our Customer Care Team on 021-111-221-331 between 10am & 6pm Monday to Friday.

What can I feed my 6 month old?

What can I feed my 6 month old? Mashed (cooked) vegetables e.g. carrot, sweet potato, broccoli Mashed fruit e.g. banana or cooked/pureed apricots, apple or pear Do not add any salt or sugar Milk is still an important part of your baby's diet, so carry on breastfeeding or giving formula. As your baby eats more solid food, his/her milk intake will continue to decrease Introduce finger foods - these encourage your baby to chew, even if they don't have teeth yet. Try cooked vegetables e.g. carrot sticks, green beans - or cubes of cheese, toast, strips of pitta bread. For more information on weaning click here

I have forgotten my password. What should I do?

If you have an existing account with us and have forgotten your password please click the 'sign in / register' link at the top of the page. Under 'Sign in to your account' please enter your email address click the 'forgotten your password?' link. We will then send you an email with instructions to reset your password. If you don't receive your password reset email within 1 hour please check your spam folder. If the email is not in your spam folder please request another one.

Disposables or reuseables?

Making the decision to try real nappies requires commitment, a belief that it's worth protecting the environment, and an up-front investment in nappy paraphernalia. You'll be surprised how far things have come since the old days. You can forget squares of terry towelling, folded into impossible origami shapes, secured with a frightening pin, then rendered waterproof by crunchy plastic pants. Now, towelling squares have been replaced by washable nappies which behave just like disposables. With a flushable liner inside, you simply whip out the liner (and any contents), flush the lot down the loo and put the nappy in a bucket ready to wash. Another washable option is 'pre-folds' (rectangles of absorbent fabric with a padded bit in the middle) with a shaped, waterproof but breathable 'nappy wrap' over the top, all secured with poppas or Velcro. But remember that it needn't be all or nothing. Why not use real nappies at home, and disposables when you're out and about? Or real nappies during the day and disposables at night? Because every single real nappy you put on your baby is one less disposable nappy to clog up a landfill site. Read more on your choices here.

When is the best time to conceive?

When to conceive However straightforward it may sound, it can take a few months to conceive. In general a healthy fertile couple has a pretty good chance of getting pregnant in a year e.g. around 30 will conceive within one month, around 60 will conceive within six months and around 85 will conceive within a year. The remainder will take longer and some of these couples may need help to get pregnant. As well as age, certain lifestyle habits can reduce your chances of conceiving. For example, a woman's chance of conceiving in the first month after stopping contraception use is reduced by about a third if the woman smokes. Drinking too much alcohol, an unhealthy diet and being underweight or overweight can also lower your likelihood of conceiving. For these reasons many couples choose to adopt a healthier lifestyle in the months before they plan to conceive. It's important to remember that if you are planning to get pregnant you should take folic acid supplements as this reduces the incidence of spina bifida in babies. The most crucial time for taking folic acid is before conception (and the first 3 months of pregnancy). You should certainly take as soon as you stop using contraception until you're 12 weeks pregnant. Folic acid protects an unborn baby against the risk of spina bifida and other neural tube birth defects. You'll need a daily supplement of 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid. If you're taking a multivitamin supplement that already contains 400mcg of folic acid, you won't need a separate folic acid supplement. Check the packet or ask your pharmacist if you are unsure. You should take a higher daily dose (5mg) of folic acid if you have had a child with a neural tube defect, you are taking anti - epileptic drugs, have diabetes or suffer from a few other conditions - please check with your doctor first as you may need a prescription for a 5mg dose. You may also want to take a 10mcg daily supplement of vitamin D. Some women have low levels of this due to their skin colour or where they live in the UK. If you're taking an antenatal multivitamin, vitamin D may be included, so check the label. There has been some debate in the news about caffeine causing fertility problems (although, there is no clear evidence). However, some studies have suggested a link between high doses of caffeine and problems with conceiving. Bear in mind that the government advises pregnant women to limit their intake of caffeine. If you have a caffeine habit, it could be worth weaning yourself off it now. The caffeine content of espressos, and coffees based on espressos, such as cappuccinos and lattes, can depend on the outlet. One study found that caffeine levels can range from 50mg per espresso at one chain to as much as 300mg per espresso in another. Some cold and flu remedies also contain caffeine. Always check the label, and ask your pharmacist if you're not sure. A woman's most fertile phase begins just before the egg is about to be released from the ovary and lasts for about 48 hours after ovulation. As sperm can live for about 5 days, a woman is most likely to conceive if intercourse takes place in the 5 days before ovulation and the 2 days after she has ovulated. In the classic 28-day menstrual cycle therefore, a woman should aim to have intercourse from day 9 to day 16 to maximize her chances of conception. The fertile phase of a woman with a 35-day cycle will begin 16 days after the first day of her last period (that is, 5 days before ovulation at day 21). The process of conception includes the fertilization of an egg by sperm and the implantation of the fertilized egg into the wall of the uterus (womb). Fertilization usually takes place as the egg travels down the fallopian tube - the tube that links the ovaries (where your eggs are produced) to the uterus. To work out the most fertile time you need to know how long your average cycle is. A menstrual cycle is measured from the first day of your period to the first day of your next period. The classic menstrual cycle is 28 days long, although only about 12% of women have this length of cycle. A cycle begins from the first day of bleeding and can vary in length from about 16 days to over 50 days. Ovulation (release of the egg) is thought to occur at around day 14 in the 28-day cycle. In longer and shorter cycles it is thought that ovulation occurs 14 days before the next period is due. Hence, in a 35-day cycle ovulation will occur at around day 21, while in a 24-day cycle it will occur at around day 10. Tips for conception for both partners It is a myth to think you should have less sex in order to conceive. In fact, having regular sex at least 3 to 4 times per week has been found to maximise the probability that you'll conceive. While some couples believe they have to "save" the man's sperm until the exact moment of ovulation, that's just simply not true. Simply taking it easy and enjoy your love life may be the best way to boost your chances. Stop smoking as this reduces your fertility. Try to cut down on alcohol and caffeine. Men should wear loose boxer shorts rather than tight-fitting underpants, optimum sperm production occurs at a temperature slightly lower than body temperature. Attempt to shed a few pounds if you are overweight. Take regular exercise and eat healthily. Some women know they are ovulating because they feel a slight pain in their back or abdomen. This is known as Mittelschmerz and usually lasts no more than a few hours. At around this time there is also a slight increase in body temperature and there is thickening of vaginal mucus which can often be seen as a thick, clear, elastic discharge (like egg white). These signs are actually used by people practising natural contraception to warn them when they should avoid intercourse. Ovulation kits are now available to help women pinpoint exactly when they are most fertile. The tests are simple to perform and quite accurate, provided you follow the instructions. If, after stopping contraception you have not conceived after about a year of regular sex, you should arrange to see your GP who may give you some simple advice or send you for tests. If you're 35 years or more, then seek help sooner. For help conceiving why not use gurgle.com's Ovulation calculator to help you find out exactly when you are most fertile each month . That way you can increase your chances of falling pregnant. Remember that even if you are having some trouble conceiving, the most important thing is to seek help and reassurance from your GP.

What should I take with me to hospital? What should I pack in my hospital bag?

Don't wait until the first contraction before wondering what to take with you to hospital. By week 36 you really should have a bag packed and waiting by the front door. Actually, you'll need two bags - one for labour, and one for your hospital stay. Here's what you'll need - and what you definitely won't need - to put in them. Labour bag Whatever you do, don't forget your hospital notes. It might be best to carry them with you in your handbag from 36 weeks. You never know! In fact, strictly speaking, if you arrive in hospital with nothing but your notes, you will be fine. But there are a few things you can take along that will make your birthing experience better. Birth plan magazines (early labour can be slow) TENS machine for early pain relief big old T-shirt or nightshirt for giving birth socks (in case your feet get cold) food and drink for your partner coins, phone card or mobile to announce your news camera with battery charged, memory empty (if digital) or a new film lipbalm Hospital bag After the birth you'll be wheeled up to the ward with your new baby. That's the point where you can make the swap from labour bag to hospital bag, which should hold everything you need for your stay in hospital. special soap and flannel - after the birth you'll either be invited to have a shower, or you'll be sponged down by a midwife. And it's great to smell nice wash bag with your normal favourite toiletries pyjamas with baggy bottoms and front-opening top for easy breastfeeding (bring a spare in case of leakage accidents) lightweight dressing gown (hospitals are hot) and slippers a bath towel tissues feeding bras, breast pads and Lansinoh nipple cream paper knickers (bleeding after birth makes disposables best) maternity sanitary towels (longer, softer and more comfortable than normal pads and midwives recommend - as they can monitor the blood loss more accurately with maternity pads than with normal ultra absorbent pads). sanitary towels (the largest you can find or special maternity pads) eye mask and ear plugs so you can get some sleep phone card (you're unlikely to be able to use your mobile in hospital) address book newborn nappies and wipes for sensitive skin vests (2-3), sleepsuits (2-3) and warm going-home outfit for baby something for you to wear to come home in (it'll need to be front fastening as you may need to breastfeed and won't want to lift a maternity dress over your head! Also, don't take your skinny jeans - they won't fit yet!) And don't bother with... pillows and pillow cases (you think hospitals don't have them?) water spray (very irritating when you're in labour) little bits of natural sponge to suck (what's wrong with sipping from a cup?) aromatherapy oil burner (naked flames don't go down well in hospitals) stopwatch to time contractions (normal watch does fine) beanbag or mats (or perhaps a three-piece suite?) flask of ice cubes (will still be frozen solid after 12 hours in labour) birth announcement cards (a job for later - or your partner)

Why do I need a special bra?

Why do I need a special bra? From around six weeks into your pregnancy you may start to notice a change in your breast size. At first you may think this is merely pre-menstrual breast tenderness, but when the test confirms you are pregnant the sensitivity and swelling won't diminish, and your breasts will continue to grow right up to - and after - the baby is born. Breast changes are usually more noticeable during your first pregnancy. Symptoms include: an increase in breast sensitivity, darkening of the areola area around the nipple and veins around the breasts become more prominent. All of these symptoms are your hormones getting your breasts ready for feeding your baby in a few months' time. Although you'll be able to continue wearing your old bras for a while, it won't be long before they become uncomfortable. That's when it's a good idea to get fitted for a couple of new bras - ideally non-wired - and to continue to return to be re-fitted every six weeks. Then, if you're planning to breastfeed, 36 to 38 weeks is the ideal time to get fitted for a feeding bra. Some of these changes can be wonderful especially if you enjoy having a slightly more voluptuous figure! What makes a good pregnancy bra? In pregnancy, bras should have no wires that might dig into delicate developing tissue. Backs, straps and sides should be wide to give as much support as possible. This is to protect the delicate ligaments that hold up your bust. Unsupported breasts can lead to stretched ligaments and permanently sagging breasts after birth. But all these clever structural bra features don't mean you have to compromise femininity. Bra manufacturers have come a long way since the industrial-sized monstrosities our mothers had to wear. You can still buy pretty, flirty matching sets with lace trims, or sexy black numbers to keep the passion alive. The ideal fit During pregnancy, big means beautiful and, as Mothercare's Moda range is designed with the help of midwives and pregnant women, we've got both function and style covered. Why get professionally fitted? Your rapidly changing body shape makes it very difficult for you to guess the right bra size. An expert fitter will be able to take into account your wider rib cage (which expands as the baby pushes up towards your diaphragm), and fit you with a bra that will allow for the following weeks' further growth. At around 36 - 38 weeks when you get fitted for a feeding bra (which has simple clips so you can drop one cup and feed your baby whenever and wherever you are) the fitter will take into account your bust size now, and use her experience to estimate how large your breasts will be when your milk kicks in a few days after the birth. Don't be surprised if the feeding bra she recommends seems enormous. In the first few weeks, until your milk supply settles down, breastfeeding breasts can exceed all your size expectations! Pregnancy briefs and tights There is of course, nothing to stop you wearing your usual briefs or knickers throughout your pregnancy, but be aware that they will tend to slip below your bump as it grows through later pregnancy. Special pregnancy briefs (which are often designed to match pregnancy bras) are designed to sit under your bump for a smoother line. You can also get maternity thongs to banish any hint of VPL, or full comfort over-the-bump knickers to cradle and support your growing tummy. In winter months conventional tights can be a nightmare, either digging in as your tummy grows, or sliding down under the bump in later months, leaving you with wrinkled knees and a baggy crotch area. Maternity tights have a super-large tummy section so you can pull them right up under your bust with no risk of them falling down. Why do I need a sleep bra? A light-weight sleep bra looks more like a teenager's cropped top, or lightweight sports bra. It can be extremely useful, offering support at night if your breasts start to feel uncomfortable or when doing light exercises like yoga. They're also very useful for holding breast pads in place during late pregnancy (if you find colostrum beginning to leak out of your nipples) and when you are actually breastfeeding. Whether it's a support bra for pregnancy or a sleep bra for night-time comfort or a nursing bra for feeding - the right it is crucial to helping you feel your best and retaining your pre-pregnancy shape after your baby is born. Your breasts may increase in size by 2lbs so they need extra support at this time. Mothercare has an extensive range of maternity lingerie to cater for all tastes and budgets. It is always best to try before you buy and to be measured - even if you have a busy schedule try to make the time. Remember a well-fitting bra also protects you from backache and helps improve your posture.

How do I search for a Gift List?

To search for a gift list you must first be logged into your account. When logged in click the 'Gift List' link at the top of the page. From here you can search for your required gift list by entering the search criteria.

Why choose a 3 wheeler?

3 wheelers offer an up to the minute look. Plus with 3 wheels they have the added benefit of better manoevreability. They are especially good if you are out and about regularly either in town on rougher terrain. View our online range here.

How do I purchase from a Gift List?

Follow the link from the gift list email you received. Find the item that you wish to purchase. Click add to basket and follow the checkout procedure

Which bottles do you sell which are BPA free?

Almost all of the bottles we sell are BPA free. We note on the product information pages which bottles are BPA free.

What is a gift list?

A gift list for your new baby can be set up on our website once you have registered. Once you set up the list you are given the option to email friends and family so they can view your list. Your friends and family will have the option to ship the gift to your address (without having to know or view your address) or their own. A gift list can also be viewed and paid for in-store.

What is a wish list?

A wish list can be set up for any event such as a birthday, christening or other event. You can set up your list on our website, www.mothercare.pk . Once you have set up your list you can email friends and family so they can view and buy online. Your friends and family will have the option to send the gift to your address (without having to know or view your address) or to their own address. A wish list can be viewed and paid for, in any of our stores.

What is a travel system?

The complete option for a new baby. A pushchair that includes an infant carrier/car seat that attaches safely and securely to the basic pushchair frame. This enables you to move your baby from pushchair to car without disturbance. Some options also include a carry cot. View our online range here

How do I create a Wish List?

When to conceive However straightforward it may sound, it can take a few months to conceive. In general a healthy fertile couple has a pretty good chance of getting pregnant in a year e.g. around 30 will conceive within one month, around 60 will conceive within six months and around 85 will conceive within a year. The remainder will take longer and some of these couples may need help to get pregnant. As well as age, certain lifestyle habits can reduce your chances of conceiving. For example, a woman's chance of conceiving in the first month after stopping contraception use is reduced by about a third if the woman smokes. Drinking too much alcohol, an unhealthy diet and being underweight or overweight can also lower your likelihood of conceiving. For these reasons many couples choose to adopt a healthier lifestyle in the months before they plan to conceive. It's important to remember that if you are planning to get pregnant you should take folic acid supplements as this reduces the incidence of spina bifida in babies. The most crucial time for taking folic acid is before conception (and the first 3 months of pregnancy). You should certainly take as soon as you stop using contraception until you're 12 weeks pregnant. Folic acid protects an unborn baby against the risk of spina bifida and other neural tube birth defects. You'll need a daily supplement of 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid. If you're taking a multivitamin supplement that already contains 400mcg of folic acid, you won't need a separate folic acid supplement. Check the packet or ask your pharmacist if you are unsure. You should take a higher daily dose (5mg) of folic acid if you have had a child with a neural tube defect, you are taking anti - epileptic drugs, have diabetes or suffer from a few other conditions - please check with your doctor first as you may need a prescription for a 5mg dose. You may also want to take a 10mcg daily supplement of vitamin D. Some women have low levels of this due to their skin colour or where they live in the UK. If you're taking an antenatal multivitamin, vitamin D may be included, so check the label. There has been some debate in the news about caffeine causing fertility problems (although, there is no clear evidence). However, some studies have suggested a link between high doses of caffeine and problems with conceiving. Bear in mind that the government advises pregnant women to limit their intake of caffeine. If you have a caffeine habit, it could be worth weaning yourself off it now. The caffeine content of espressos, and coffees based on espressos, such as cappuccinos and lattes, can depend on the outlet. One study found that caffeine levels can range from 50mg per espresso at one chain to as much as 300mg per espresso in another. Some cold and flu remedies also contain caffeine. Always check the label, and ask your pharmacist if you're not sure. A woman's most fertile phase begins just before the egg is about to be released from the ovary and lasts for about 48 hours after ovulation. As sperm can live for about 5 days, a woman is most likely to conceive if intercourse takes place in the 5 days before ovulation and the 2 days after she has ovulated. In the classic 28-day menstrual cycle therefore, a woman should aim to have intercourse from day 9 to day 16 to maximize her chances of conception. The fertile phase of a woman with a 35-day cycle will begin 16 days after the first day of her last period (that is, 5 days before ovulation at day 21). The process of conception includes the fertilization of an egg by sperm and the implantation of the fertilized egg into the wall of the uterus (womb). Fertilization usually takes place as the egg travels down the fallopian tube - the tube that links the ovaries (where your eggs are produced) to the uterus. To work out the most fertile time you need to know how long your average cycle is. A menstrual cycle is measured from the first day of your period to the first day of your next period. The classic menstrual cycle is 28 days long, although only about 12% of women have this length of cycle. A cycle begins from the first day of bleeding and can vary in length from about 16 days to over 50 days. Ovulation (release of the egg) is thought to occur at around day 14 in the 28-day cycle. In longer and shorter cycles it is thought that ovulation occurs 14 days before the next period is due. Hence, in a 35-day cycle ovulation will occur at around day 21, while in a 24-day cycle it will occur at around day 10. Tips for conception for both partners It is a myth to think you should have less sex in order to conceive. In fact, having regular sex at least 3 to 4 times per week has been found to maximise the probability that you'll conceive. While some couples believe they have to "save" the man's sperm until the exact moment of ovulation, that's just simply not true. Simply taking it easy and enjoy your love life may be the best way to boost your chances. Stop smoking as this reduces your fertility. Try to cut down on alcohol and caffeine. Men should wear loose boxer shorts rather than tight-fitting underpants, optimum sperm production occurs at a temperature slightly lower than body temperature. Attempt to shed a few pounds if you are overweight. Take regular exercise and eat healthily. Some women know they are ovulating because they feel a slight pain in their back or abdomen. This is known as Mittelschmerz and usually lasts no more than a few hours. At around this time there is also a slight increase in body temperature and there is thickening of vaginal mucus which can often be seen as a thick, clear, elastic discharge (like egg white). These signs are actually used by people practising natural contraception to warn them when they should avoid intercourse. Ovulation kits are now available to help women pinpoint exactly when they are most fertile. The tests are simple to perform and quite accurate, provided you follow the instructions. If, after stopping contraception you have not conceived after about a year of regular sex, you should arrange to see your GP who may give you some simple advice or send you for tests. If you're 35 years or more, then seek help sooner. For help conceiving why not use gurgle.com's Ovulation calculator to help you find out exactly when you are most fertile each month . That way you can increase your chances of falling pregnant. Remember that even if you are having some trouble conceiving, the most important thing is to seek help and reassurance from your GP.

Stroller Safety Leaflet

Please click here to view our leaflet giving advice on how to use strollers safely.

When is your new catalogue launched?

We produce two catalogues a year. Our Spring/Summer catalogues are usually launched at the beginning of February, and our Autumn/Winter catalogue is launched at the beginning of August.

Can I request an ‘extra care hinge cover’ for my mothercare stroller?

Parents should be assured that all mothercare strollers, if used in accordance with the instructions provided, are completely safe to use. For more information on stroller safely please read the attached leaflet Stroller Safety Leaflet If you are looking for added reassurance, we do offer �extra care hinge covers� which are designed to fit your mothercare stroller. If you would like to order an �extra care hinge cover� please call customer service on 0844 875 5222.

What gift should I get for a newborn baby?

Choosing a gift for any child can be difficult, but we're here to help. Use our online Gift Finder to find the perfect choice for any child.

When I place an order, how long does delivery take and how much does it cost?

Standard delivery orders will be delivered within 4 - 5 working days and is currently FREE on all orders above Rs.2500/-

What's the difference between a twin and a tandem?

A twin is a pushchair that seats 2 babies or children side by side. A tandem seats one in front of the other. We have a wide range of twins and tandems, and even some triple pushchairs. View our online range here.

I've placed an order and would like to know what couriers you use?

We work with multiple courier partners, and may depend on your geographical location, from which the order may be sent. 

I have just found out I am pregnant. What do I need?

You can find a wide selection of pregnancy essentials both online and in store. View our online range here.

Can I gift wrap my order?

Unfortunately we are unable to offer Gift Wrapping on products at this time. We are sorry for any disappoinment this may cause, please keep checking our website for updates as we are hoping to rectify this shortly.

What is the difference between a 'Hearthguard' and a 'Fireguard'?

A 'Fireguard' protects from the heat source, a 'Hearthguard' prevents access to the heat source. For a product to be called a 'Fireguard' it would have to pass different tests to meet the standard.

What is a 2 in 1?

A pushchair that combines the classic comfort of a pram (your baby can lie flat facing you from birth) with the versatility and convenience of a pushchair once your baby can sit upright.

I have received my voucher but when I tried to use it, it would not take the discount off of all of my items, why is this?

As with all discount vouchers, there are terms and conditions. These may change occasionally, depending upon the promotion, but each voucher has them printed clearly for you to read through. Some specific products may be excluded from promotions as will any reduced or special offer items. For full details, please refer to your voucher, or get in touch, using the 'Contact Us' button below, or by calling 021-111-221-331.

How do I add an item to my Gift List?

When you find a toy you would like to save for later, simply click the �add to gift list' button. Then you can give your wish list a name and the toy will be saved for you to access at any time.

What is the relationship between Mothercare and Early Learning Centre?

ELC became part of the Mothercare company in June 2007, for more information about the two companies, please click here to look at our Corporate profile pages.

What's your stance on Environmental issues, including Recycling and the Packaging you use?

We take our responsibility towards the environment very seriously and we have set targets to reduce energy, increase the amount of recycling we do and reduce the amount of Packaging on our products. Please click here for more information about our commitment to the environment.

What time does your customer care team operate, and how can I get in contact?

You can contact our customer care team by email or phone. We are open from 10am to 6pm Monday to Friday. Click here to contact us by email, we aim to respond within 24 hours or call us on 021-111-221-331

Can I pay with a Gift Card online?

Unfortunately we cannot currently accept payment with Gift Cards online. Please visit your local store to use your card. You can also place orders for web exclusive items in store using your gift card.

How can I return an item?

to return an item please click here

How do I go about getting a refund?

to know more about refund, please click here

How can I pay?

You can opt for Cash on Delivery, Bank transfer or use credit or debit cards. We accept Visa and Mastercard. However you decide to pay, the price of your order stays the same. So simply choose whichever is most convenient for you. We also accept most major international credit cards. Unfortunately we do not accept paypal.

What do I do if I receive items which are faulty?

We do have measures in place to ensure we offer the hightest level of quality across all of our products, so I'm sorry this slipped through the net this time. If you feel you have purchased a faulty product, you can  email us with full details at support@mothercare.pk, or call us on 021-111-221-331, and we'll be able to assist you further.

How do I know if my online order has been successful?

When you send an order through this website, we will reply to you with an email confirming everything. Please check that all the information is correct on this confirmation email. As soon as you send your order through the web, it is a firm purchase.

What are 'working' days?

Monday to Friday are working days. Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays are not working days.

Where do you deliver?

We deliver to most of the cities/disricts in Pakistan. Please be aware that some of our products are delivered directly from our stores. For full delivery information on each item, please refer to the product detail page. We don't offer international delivery service.

Why has my order been cancelled?

If you haven't requested the cancellation of your order, you may contact us at our helpline 021-111-221-331 or email us at support@mothercare.pk

I've received a discount voucher but the code doesn't work online, why is this?

Please be aware that once you have applied the voucher code, it cannot be used again, so please do not apply it until you are sure that you are ready to place and pay for your order. Most common reasons for promotion codes not working are: being out of date; being applied to products that are not eligible or the order limit not being reached. If you are experiencing any problems at all applying your promotion code, and none of the above conditions applies please contact the Customer Care Team where they will be pleased to assist you. Please call us on 021-111-221-331 Monday to Friday 10am - 6pm

I returned some items but I haven't received my refund. Why?

Our refunds are processed when your items arrive back at our warehouse. Please allow 15 days for the refund to be processed In the unlikely event that you haven't received your refund within this time, please contact our customer care team by clicking on the contact us link at the bottom of the page or by phone on 021-111-221-331 from 10am - 6pm Monday - Friday.

What do I do if the item I receive is not what I've ordered?

We do have tight measures in place to ensure all orders are successful and correct, so I apologise this has slipped through and you've received an incorrect item. We have a few options to sort this out for you as quickly as possible: 1. You can take the item to your local store to exchange for the correct item. Please take your advice note with you to show the store staff the error. They will then be delighted to sort this out for you. 2. Call us on 021-111-221-331 or email us at support@mothercare.pk, stating the item received and the item you wanted. We'll then arrange to send you the correct item.

I have used my discount code, but the discount was not applied to all the items, why is this?

The discounts we offer are subject to certain terms and conditions and part of these terms and conditions are that the voucher is not valid in conjunction with any other offer, including reduced items or star buys". We apologise for the disappointment caused, and that this time the promotion hasn't met your expectations. If you feel that we've deducted your discount incorrectly, please drop us an email by clicking on the Contact Us button below, and we'll look into this for you. Please be aware that once you have applied the voucher code, it cannot be used again, so please do not apply it until you are sure that you are ready to place and pay for your order. Most common reasons for promotion codes not working are: being out of date; being applied to products that are not eligible or the order limit not being reached. If you are experiencing any problems at all applying your promotion code, and none of the above conditions applies please contact the Customer Care Team so where they will be pleased to assist you. Please call us on 021-111-221-331 (10am-6pm Mon - Fri) or email us at support@mothercare.pk, and we'll be happy to explain how you can redeem your discount online.

How do I find out about upcoming promotions?

We'd be delighted to tell you all about our upcoming exciting events, and if you would like regular updates please email us by clicking on the 'Contact ELC' button below, with a request to be added to our Mailing List. We will then send you our current catalogue (and in the future you will receive the new version automatically). You may also be selected to receive discounts and other fabulous offers throughout the year, as well as notifications of store events, either via email or by post - you can choose how.

How can I remove my details from your mailing list?

Once you've logged in, please click on the 'sign in' link at the top of the website. From here you'll see the 'personal details & contact preferences' section, which will have a tick next to the email opt-ins you currently receive. Simply click on the boxes with a tick to remove, and you'll no longer receive our emails. Alternatively, you can click on the 'unsubscribe' link at the bottom of all our marketing emails. However, if you recieve postal mailings or if you still require assistance to remove your details, please click on the 'Contact Mothercare' button below, and we'll be delighted to look into this for you, and make any necessary changes.

Can I use my promotional discount I've received from Mothercare in Early Learning Centre and vice versa?

I'm pleased to say that if you're a member of our Big Birthday Club, you can redeem your discount in the Mothercare stores that have an Early Learning Centre concession, but only on toys that are sold in Early Learning Centre*. From time to time we do send out promotional discounts, and we're now a sister company of Mothercare, there will be brand specific promotions, and more generic promotions. To find out where you can redemm your discount, please refer to the Terms and Conditions on the voucher you've received that will tell you how and where you can use your discount. *Please note that there are exclusions which can be found on the voucher itself.

Can you help me with my school / college project / studies?

Thanks for thinking of Early Learning Centre to help you with your studies. We have so many enquiries like this that unfortunately it's not possible for us to respond to everyone. You can obtain a huge amount of information from the Early Learning Centre catalogues, click here to order one. We also have a wealth of information about both of our brands on our website, click here to find out more. We hope you find all of the information that you need to help you with your studies - good luck!

You've sent me a discount code, but I've lost it. Can you send me another one?

Our mailings are sent out automatically and once sent we're unable to re-send. I'm sorry for any disappointment this may cause.

Do you accept cheque payments?

We no longer accept payment by cheque in our stores (including our Shop Home Delivery Service) or through ELC Direct.

Can I use my discount voucher when purchasing all products?

Please check the Terms and Conditions on your voucher, or call us on 0871 231 3511, not all discounts will apply to all of our products. We're sorry for any disappointment caused.

Can I recycle my toys?

From 1st July 2007 manufacturers and retailers have to fund the collection and recycling of waste electronic equipment - including electronic toys. Early Learning Centre has joined a scheme (the Distributor Take back Scheme) which funds a network of collection services around the UK. As an Early Learning Customer you can take old electronic toys to one of the many collection centres that have been set up. For advice on all aspects of recycling, including recycling of waste electronic toys, please visit www.recycle-more.co.uk where you can find out the location of collection points near to you.

What is Weee?

From 1st July 2007 manufacturers and retailers have to fund the collection and recycling of waste electronic equipment. Mothercare has joined a scheme (the Distributor Take back Scheme) which funds a network of collection services around the UK. As a Mothercare customer you can take old electronic toys to one of the many collection centres that have been set up. For advice on all aspects of recycling, including recycling of waste electronic products, please visit www.recycle-more.co.uk where you can find out the location of collection points near to you.

What is the relationship between Early Learning Centre and Mothercare?

We are delighted to announce that Mothercare became our sister company in June 2007, and with 60 years combined experience providing for the needs of mothers and young children, no one knows more about young families than this family. You'll find everything a mum-to-be or a new parent might need for their new arrival, from cots and car seats to the UK's widest collection of pushchairs. Visit http://www.mothercare.com for the full range, or call 0844 875 5111.

What are cookies and how do they affect me?

This site uses cookies. Cookies are pieces of data that are sent from our website to your browser, which may then store them on your computer system. Cookies cannot gather or store personal information. We use cookies to see how our website is used, find out what areas are popular, and then improve the site. This site uses both �session cookies', which disappear as soon as you close your browser, and �permanent cookies', which are kept on your computer. Neither of these types of cookie stores or gathers any personal information about you. To shop at www.elc.co.uk you need to have cookies enabled on your browser. The most common browser used today is Internet Explorer. To turn cookies on in Internet Explorer, please perform the following actions: Select the 'Tools' option in the browser window, Select the 'Internet Options' menu, Select the Privacy tab, and set the level to 'medium-high' This will ensure that cookies are enabled and the site will remember your details, without exposing you to unwanted 3rd party cookies.

How do I recycle my electronic items?

From 1st July 2007 manufacturers and retailers have to fund the collection and recycling of waste electronic equipment. Mothercare has joined a scheme (the Distributor Take back Scheme) which funds a network of collection services around the UK. As a Mothercare customer you can take old electronic toys to one of the many collection centres that have been set up. For advice on all aspects of recycling, including recycling of waste electronic products, please visit www.recycle-more.co.uk where you can find out the location of collection points near to you.

Do you test your products on animals?

At Early Learning Centre we take every care in developing our toys with regards to safety, quality and value. As part of this development process we work closely with suppliers to ensure that they comply with current legislation. The cornerstone of our supplier relationships is trust and honesty, we choose to work with like-minded suppliers whose attitudes to issues like animal testing are in-line with our own. We've an ongoing dialogue with these suppliers and animal testing remains an issue we will not compromise on. I hope that we've assured you that we do not condone animal testing.

What is a 'Star Buy'?

A Star Buy is a product that we feel is fantastic value for money, and has a special offer attached to it. Either a saving when buying two products together, or a product that comes with free accessories. Star Buys cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer, so if you have a discount it will not be applied to these Star Buy offers, which is outlined in the terms and conditions of our promotional vouchers.

How do I recycle my batteries?

The Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations Under the Waste Battery Regulations, Mothercare and ELC are now offering a take back scheme for all portable waste batteries. You can return your waste batteries to our stores in person and we will recycle (please do not post). For advice on all aspects of recycling, including recycling of waste electronic products, please visit www.recycle-more.co.uk where you can find out the location of collection points near to you.

What do I do with my old batteries?

The Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations Under the Waste Battery Regulations, Mothercare and ELC are now offering a take back scheme for all portable waste batteries. You can return your waste batteries to our stores in person and we will recycle (please do not post). For advice on all aspects of recycling, including recycling of waste electronic products, please visit www.recycle-more.co.uk where you can find out the location of collection points near to you.

What is your green policy?

To see what steps we are taking to become greener, please click here.

Why do you sell products in pink and blue?

Colour plays a huge part in children's lives but it's become a tradition for parents to dress baby girls in pink and boys in blue. However, the question arises that do children really prefer these colours or is colour stereotyping imposed on them by their parents? According to child psychologists, research now shows that gender is a major factor in determining children's colour preferences, with most boys typically preferring blue and girls preferring pink from infancy. To meet the needs of these colour preferences and to ensure children are given a choice, Early Learning Centre are offering limited products in both blue and pink variations. Colour is vital to children's learning skills, it makes their world fun, stimulates their minds and enhances their development. Child psychologists believe that children develop their colour preferences through a range of means which are partly determined by innate factors (i.e. born with a predisposition to like either pink or blue) and partly determined by experience (i.e. parents selecting colours for their children). Despite these findings children should be allowed free choice when it comes to colour and should not be limited by gender stereotypes. Children are born with the ability to discriminate between colours and continue to develop and change their colour preferences as they grow older. In this respect, the freedom to make their own colour choices plays a major role in enhancing their development.

I noticed that an item I wanted to purchase was on offer, but when I returned to buy the toy, the offer ended. Can I still claim this discount?

Like all retailers we do offer promotions on certain lines from time to time, these offers can't be back dated or offered retrospectively. I'm sorry for any disappointment caused this time.

A toy I want to order is showing as out of stock, but the 'reserve this toy' button is not showing. Why?

We provide the 'Reserve This Toy' feature on our most popular toys where we are confident we will receive more stock in the near future. It's usually within a couple of weeks. So, if 'Reserve This Toy' button is not shown, we may still be getting the item back in stock. It might just be a little longer for us to receive the delivery, and we don't want to make promises we can't keep.

What safety standards do your toys comply with?

All our toys meet and exceed all British and European standards for toy safety, and we're delighted with our ongoing association with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, who work with us in the development of our toys. We test our toys just like your kids do. We push them down the stairs, throw them, jump on them, knock them over, poke fingers in them and even lick them. So we know our toys are as tough as the children that play with them. At Early Learning Centre, we do all we can to help mums help children grow into happy, self-confident people. We create fantastic toys - toys that help develop vital skills, toys that help children get off to the best possible start, and toys that are tremendous fun. All our toys are designed to help children explore the boundaries of their imaginations and creativity, to make learning fun and help children be all they can be.

I have a new idea for a toy, who can I contact to take this forward?

Thanks for thinking of Early Learning Centre to take your new idea forward. We have our own in-house design team and suppliers who provide us with a constant supply of great new products, therefore we are unable to consider your idea. We apologise for the disappointment this may cause, but wish you every success for the future.

Do you sell toys specifically for children who are left-handed?

All Early Learning Centre toys are designed for all children, we don't discriminate or make exceptions. However, we do recognise that children by their very nature are different and will always have different needs depending on what stage of development they are at, and which toys appeal to them or that they enjoy playing with. Our store staff are always happy to provide advice on appropriate toys for individual childrens' needs. To find your nearest store who can provide you with this one to one specialist service, please follow this link to our Store Finder. Additionally, you may find the following contact details helpful to find what you are looking for: Anything Left Handed, 57 Brewer Street, London, W1R 3FB

The orange scissors shown on the packaging of the Portable Art Desk are missing from my item, why is this?

Green or blue scissors have been included in the product but these are larger than the orange ones so do not fit into the plastic tray as they should. The scissors can be found with the A4 paper by removing the whole tray.

Do you sell toys for children with Dyslexia?

All Early Learning Centre toys are designed for all children, we don't discriminate or make exceptions. However, we do recognise that children by their very nature are different and will always have different needs depending on what stage of development they are at, and which toys appeal to them or that they enjoy playing with. Our store staff are always happy to provide advice on appropriate toys for individual childrens' needs. To find your nearest store who can provide you with this one to one specialist service, please follow this link to our Store Finder. Additionally, you may wish to contact the British Dyslexia Association and their contact details are: British Dyslexia Association, 98 London Road, Reading, Berks, RG1 5AU. Or you can visit their website by clicking here.

My child suffers from allergies, and would like to know if any of your products contain nuts or gluten?

We don't hold a definitive list of what products contain nuts, gluten or other allergens. However, we've found out the following, which I hope will be helpful. PRODUCT CONTAINS GLUTEN CONTAINS NUTS SOFT STUFF YES NO MAGIC MAIZE YES NO PAINTS NO NO CRAYONS NO NO INK NO NO CLAY NO NO All our paints and crayons are non-toxic, and will not cause any harm to your little ones. If you have any specific products you would like clarification on, please drop us an email by clicking on the �Contact ELC' button below, and we'll be happy to check for you.

Is the wood in your toys sustainable?

To see our full Environmental Policy, please click here.

Can I use voucher codes on a special buy item?

Our special buy items are already offered at our best possible price, so are not included in any further promotions. Please click here to view the terms and conditions for our voucher codes.

Bike FAQ and Size Guide

Please click here for Frequently Asked Questions regarding our Bikes. We have also compiled a sizing guide for Bikes which can be viewed here.

How can I find information about my local store?

Visit our store locator for lots of information on your local store, including facilities, location and opening hours. If you wish to find out if your local store has an item in stock, please contact the store directly.

Does my local store have a particular item in stock?

You can use our Store Finder to look up your local store and call them before you visit to check they have the products you are looking for.

Where can I find information on the Mothercare Group Foundation?

The Mothercare Group Foundation was registered with the Charity Commission on 16th June 2004 and was created in order that Mothercare could have a more focused approach to charitable activities. For more information visit our Community Page.

yet I haven't received a confirmation email. Why? MC

I've placed an order online and it looked as though it was processed

What is ‘Collect In Store?’

You can place an order for an item online and have it delivered to the store of your choice. This service is free of charge for all orders. Collect In Store is available in the majority of our stores, to find out if your local store offers this service please use our Store Finder and look for the Collect In Store logo. Collect in store

I have only received part of my order, when will the rest be delivered?

On a Standard delivery please allow up to 4-5 working days to receive the whole of your order. If it is over 5 working days, then please contact us via the 'contact us' option at the bottom of the webpage, otherwise please contact our customer care team on 021-111-221-331.

Can I place my order on line and collect it in my local store?

Collect In Store is available in the majority of our stores, to find out if your local store offers this service please see our store locator and look for the Collect In Store logo. Collect in store

I've ordered from my friend's Gift List but it isn't showing as purchased on the list. Why?

If you have purchased a product from a friends gift list it will show up as purchased. The only time that this may not happen is if you view your friends list but instead of clicking 'add to basket' directly from the list, you have browsed the site and selected to add to basket from elsewhere such as one of the product search pages. Unfortunately purchases made in this fashion will not register as a gift list purchase.

Where are Gift List purchases sent?

All purchases will be sent directly to the address that you request.

Where are Wish List purchases sent?

All purchases will be delivered directly to the address that you request. When you proceed to checkout your address book has the option to choose or add more addresses.

How do I update my Gift List?

To update a gift list please login to your mothercare.com account using the sign in / register link at the top of the page. You will be redirected to your 'my account' page. From here please select the gift list option. You will then be presented with your gift lists. Please click the 'edit gift list' button.

How do I update my Wish List?

You can login to your Wish List at anytime and add more items or delete items you no longer require - or even add comments to each item letting everyone know how much you really want something!

How do I delete an item from my Gift List?

When you registered for a mothercare.com account a blank wish list was automatically created for you. In order to add products to your list simply browse through our products online. Click on the product you wish to add to view the 'product details' page. Below the 'add to basket' you will see an 'add to wish list' link. Click here to add the product to your list.

How do I add an item to my Wish List?

When you registered for a mothercare.com account a blank wish list was automatically created for you. In order to add products to your list simply browse through our products online. Click on the product you wish to add to view the 'product details' page. Below the 'add to basket' you will see an 'add to wish list' link. Click here to add the product to your list.

How do I delete an item from my Wish List?

To remove an item from your wish list please login to your mothercare.com account. You will then be redirected to your 'my account' page. If you are already logged in please click the 'my account' link at the top of the page. From here please select the wish list option. You will now see a list of all the products currently active on your wishlist. Please click the 'remove' button on the right hand side of the page which relates to the product you want removed.

What are the early symptoms of pregnancy? Am I pregnant?

The first indication most women have that they might be pregnant is missing a period. However there are many signs of pregnancy. Not all women experience all of these signs. But if you have been trying for a baby and you experience any of these symptoms, buy a home pregnancy test to see if your suspicions are correct. Then it's a good idea to go and see your doctor or midwife to have the pregnancy confirmed. Monthly periods stop The first hint that most women have that they might be pregnant is that they miss their monthly period. However, many women do not have regular menstrual cycles, and even those women whose cycles are generally regular can have late or missed periods, without being pregnant. Stress, tiredness and stopping the oral contraceptive pill can disrupt the menstrual cycle. Trying for a baby can be very stressful indeed - and also tiring - so even if your period is a couple of weeks overdue it isn't a guarantee of pregnancy. Morning sickness After a missed period, morning sickness is the next most obvious sign most women have that they are pregnant. Not all women experience morning sickness during pregnancy, but between half and two-thirds do. Those that do experience it usually begin feeling nauseous within 2 weeks to 2 months of conception. Luckily, morning sickness rarely lasts the entire length of the pregnancy, and usually goes away once the pregnancy reaches three or four months. Although called morning sickness, symptoms of nausea related to pregnancy can occur at any time of the day. While some women just feel sick, others actually vomit. There are many theories about what actually causes morning sickness. Some doctors think that morning sickness is prompted by the changes that occur in the body during pregnancy, which affect hormone levels, blood pressure and the digestive system. But whatever the cause of morning sickness, be assured that while it may make you feel quite rough, it will not harm your developing baby. Tender or swollen breasts When you are pregnant, your breasts will become larger and may feel tender. You may also notice darkening of the nipples. These changes are your body preparing for breastfeeding once the baby is born. You may notice these changes in your breasts as early as the first month of pregnancy. Tiredness During the first few months of pregnancy you may feel tired and extremely sleepy. You feel tired because the baby is growing rapidly inside you and your body has to adjust to this. Weight gain As the baby grows, so will you. Obviously you will notice that your belly swells as the baby develops in the womb, but weight gain is not just limited here. You are storing fat to prepare for after the birth when you will be breastfeeding. Backache An aching back is common during pregnancy and can begin at any time. The pain is a response to the redistribution of weight in your body. The weight of the developing baby in the womb puts stress on your back. Food cravings Many women have cravings for odd foods when they are pregnant. You may find yourself craving something that you do not normally like, such as pickles. Alternatively you may find yourself wanting to eat odd combinations of food, for example, banana and bacon sandwiches. If you become pregnant again, you are likely to find that your food cravings are different each time. Some women also find that they have a slightly metallic taste in their mouth during early pregnancy. Frequent urination Within 2 to 3 months of becoming pregnant you will probably find that you need to go to the toilet far more often than usual. This is because your growing baby is squashing your bladder, and because the size of the bladder does not increase during pregnancy, you may sometimes find that you need to urinate urgently. It is therefore a good idea to plan ahead when travelling or going on outings to make sure you know where the toilets are if you need them. Blocked nose and sinuses Some women find that they have a 'stuffy' nose during early pregnancy, sometimes even before they have missed a period. This is because the hormone changes in your body brought about by pregnancy affect mucus production in your nose and sinuses. Although not all women experience all these signs, they are a good indicator that changes are taking place in your body. So think about getting a test and hope for good news!

What are my maternity rights?

When you're expecting a baby there are lots of laws that protect your rights at work, from how much time you can have off, to how much maternity pay you'll get, and there are various laws to protect the health of you and your baby. Sometimes, ploughing through all that legal-speak is hard work, so here is a checklist of the basics, followed by useful links where you can find more detailed information. Your qualifying week: many of the laws below talk about your 'qualifying week'. This is the 15th week before your baby is due (that is, week 25 of your pregnancy). Keep your dates in mind, as this is the week on which many of the benefits calculations are based. Telling your boss you're pregnant You're not legally obliged to tell your boss you're expecting until your qualifying week (week 25). But it may be a good idea to spill the beans earlier as it'll help your employer plan for cover when you're on maternity leave. It also means you'll be able to go off to antenatal appointments, and to talk about changing your working conditions if you think you need to (you may need to switch to a desk-based job, or avoid lifting heavy machinery, that sort of thing). When you do formally tell your employer about your pregnancy, put together a letter stating when you'd like your maternity leave and your maternity pay to start (for example, two weeks before the birth). With the letter you'll need to enclose your MATB1 form (which your midwife will give you at about 20 weeks of pregnancy). Once you have told your boss, talk to Human Resources to find out exact details of what you are entitled to. Some companies, for instance, offer enhanced parental leave packages or will be prepared to allow you to vary your hours to avoid the rush hour. Your rights Many employers are supportive of their pregnant employees. However, even if yours isn't, you cannot legally be fired, singled out for redundancy or given worse conditions simply because of your pregnancy. For instance, taking away your company car because you are pregnant or laying you off to avoid having to pay maternity pay would be illegal. Your employer must also take care to ensure your work isn't harmful to you or your baby. So, for instance, if you work with chemicals that might harm the baby, you should be transferred to other duties. Your boss might ask you if you intend to come back. You do not have to give a definite answer on this. The company must hold your job open for you so you can make a decision after the birth. Health rights You'll get paid time off for antenatal appointments - and this includes parentcraft or antenatal classes as well as medical appointments. If your employer asks, you'll need to provide proof that you are going to antenatal appointments. Dads-to-be aren't legally entitled to have paid time off for these appointments, but many manage to come to an informal agreement with their employer. If your job could be dangerous for your baby, your boss has to find you alternative work. If this isn't possible you're entitled to leave on full pay. It's not just obviously dangerous jobs - like firefighting or working with toxic chemicals - that need to be considered. Even your workstation and chair, or the lack of frequent breaks to go to the loo, can be a problem for a pregnant mum. So once your employer knows you're pregnant, they have to do an assessment and make sure you're safe. You also get free prescriptions and NHS dental treatment from pregnancy until your baby is one year old. To get your exemption certificate, get form FW8 from your midwife and send it in to your health authority. When can you start your maternity leave? The earliest time is 11 weeks before you are due to give birth. Alternatively, you can carry on working as long as you like, right up until your waters break. It may be uncomfortable, but it does mean you get maximum time off with your baby. If you are still working when your baby is born, your leave will officially start the day after the birth. If you find you have to take time off with pregnancy-related health problems in the last four weeks before your due date, your employer can ask that you start your maternity leave. How long can you have off work? All mums can take up to 52 weeks (1 years) maternity leave, regardless of the length of service with the employer which 26 weeks (six months) will be ordinary maternity leave (OML). An additional 26 weeks maternity leave (AML) can be taken making a total of 52 weeks maternity leave, however certain terms and conditions will apply. Any babies due on or after the 1st April 2007 will receive an additional 13 weeks paid maternity leave (AML) making a total of 39 weeks paid maternity leave equating to 26 weeks paid maternity during your OML and 13 paid maternity leave during your AML. Even complete workaholics are obliged to take two weeks off - that's compulsory! How much will you be paid? Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) is paid by the employer, to mums who have worked for that employer for 26 weeks continuously by the time they reach their qualifying week (15 weeks before your baby is due). You'll have to have earned at least �87 per week on average in the two months before that date. If you qualify, you'll get 90% of your average earnings for the first six weeks, then (for the next 33 weeks), either 90% of your average earnings or �112.75 per week, whichever is the lowest. During this time you keep any company benefits such as company car or holiday pay. If you decide to extend your maternity leave into AML, you won't get paid, and you will no longer be entitled to company benefits such as the company car. If your baby was born before April 2007, SMP was 26 weeks. Self-employed? You may be entitled to Maternity Allowance, which is paid directly by the government. To qualify, you need to have worked for 26 weeks out of the 15 months before your baby's due date. For half of these weeks, you need to have been paid at least �30 per week. If you qualify, you'll get either 90% of your average earnings or �108.85 per week, whichever is the lowest, for a total of six months (rising to nine months in April 2007). To claim maternity allowance, go to your local Jobcentre Plus and fill in form MA1. Take your MTAB1 (the form you get from your midwife at 20 weeks) too, as well as all your payslips showing you have worked for the relevant 26 weeks. What about dads? Your partner can claim Statutory Paternity Pay and Leave if he has worked for his boss for six months by the time you reach your qualifying week, and has earned a minimum of �87 a week. He'll get two weeks leave paid at �112.75 per week, or 90% of his average weekly earnings if it is less. You must let your employer know that you want to take paternity leave at least 15 weeks before the baby's official due date. If the baby arrives unexpectedly, you can still take the leave as long as you notified your employer. Going back to work If you're going back to work at the end of maternity leave, you don't need to give notice of your return. But if you decide you do want to go back early, you'll have to give 28 days notice. If you decide not to go back to work, you have to give your normal amount of notice. But you don't have to pay back your SMP. If you're not sure, you can think about it during maternity leave. As long as you give your employer the right notice that you're not coming back, that's fine. Once you're back you can ask for flexible working hours and your employer is obliged to consider your request. Need some more help? Some low-income families may get a Sure Start Maternity Grant to help with the costs of a new baby - check at your local Jobcentre Plus. If you're not entitled to SMP or MA, you may get Incapacity Benefit. Once your baby is born, you'll be entitled to child benefit. Links Working Families has detailed advice for pregnant and new mums. Your Jobcentre Plus or Social Security Office (see your local phone book) has leaflets, information and application forms - telephone or go in for advice. The government site (direct.gov.uk/employees) has up-to-date information plus an interactive tool that gives a personalised guide to your maternity and parental rights. Parental leave Parental leave is unpaid leave of up to 13 weeks that you and your partner can take before your child is 5 (or up to 18 if a child is disabled). It is only open to parents who have been with the same employer for a year or more and you can take up to four weeks in one year, or pro-rata if either of you works part-time. For more info about maternity leave and statutory maternity pay try calling ACAS on 08457 47 47 47.

Can I take medicine during my pregnancy?

You have a headache and you don't know what to do. Can you take some painkillers, or will they harm your baby? It is widely known that many drugs can have potentially harmful effects on an unborn baby. Therefore it is very important to check with a pharmacist or your GP before taking any medication when you are pregnant or trying for a baby. Before pregnancy Some women inadvertently take an over-the-counter medication before they know that they are pregnant. Often the manufacturer will state on the packaging that the drug should not be taken during pregnancy, but this is often just to be on the safe side for legal reasons. Your GP will be able to advise you if there is any risk to the developing baby. Paracetemol is thought to be safe for short term use for pain and fever during pregnancy. Hoever, do avoid anti-inflammatorys such as Ibruprofen. If you are in any doubts check with your pharmacist or midwife first. Occasionally a woman may get pregnant while taking the oral contraceptive pill, but most brands are thought not to be harmful to a foetus. Any women taking medication for long-term conditions, such as asthma or diabetes, should consult their doctor as soon as possible, ideally before they conceive. In these situations any minor risks to the growing baby must be balanced against the likelihood of the illness getting worse if the medication is stopped. In many cases the medication will be continued, so it is essential that you do not stop any regular medication before seeking medical advice. In some women with conditions such as epilepsy and high blood pressure, it is known that some drugs are safer than others during pregnancy and so the medication may be changed. Women with ongoing health problems will be monitored closely during their pregnancy. Before falling pregnant it is now recommended that you start taking folic acid, a vitamin supplement. It is known that taking a supplement of 400 micrograms of folic acid daily for the first 12 weeks of pregnancy reduces the risk of the baby developing a condition known as spina bifida. Iron supplements are not routinely recommended unless you are found to be anaemic after a blood test; this is because they often cause constipation as a side effect. It is best to eat a healthy mixed diet including green vegetables and some red meat to build up your iron stores. The first 3 months The first three months of pregnancy (first trimester) is the time when the baby's organs are being formed. The 3rd to the 11th week is therefore the stage when harmful drugs are most likely to cause birth defects. In the early 1960s, Thalidomide was prescribed to some pregnant women to combat morning sickness and caused limb malformations in affected babies. Since this tragedy, medication is rarely prescribed for morning sickness unless vomiting is excessive and there is a risk of dehydration occurring. If medication is needed for any problem during pregnancy, your GP will tend to choose an established drug that has been used safely for many years. New drugs are not necessarily unsafe, but there may be little information available about their use in pregnancy. Months 3-9 In the second and third trimester (3-9 months) drugs may affect the growth of the baby or cause damage to the baby's tissues. Drugs taken towards the end of pregnancy or during labour can sometimes affect the newborn baby - it is wise to check with your GP at this stage in your pregnancy before you take any medicines, such as strong painkillers. Treating minor illnesses Pregnant women often suffer from minor ailments such as constipation and indigestion. To prevent constipation, a high-fibre diet is helpful, with lots of wholemeal bread, a bran-containing cereal and an increased fluid intake. If this does not solve the problem then lactulose, a mild laxative, is often prescribed. It is important that you do not strain as this can cause haemorrhoids (piles), which is another common problem during pregnancy. For indigestion and heartburn it is helpful to prop yourself up with extra pillows at bedtime or elevate the head of the bed using a pillow under the mattress. Mild antacid remedies, such as a magnesium trisilicate mixture, are safe to use. For coughs and colds, try inhaling menthol and eucalyptus and drinking extra fluids and honey and lemon drinks. Paracetamol is safe for a temperature or headache. Most cough mixtures are known to actually have little beneficial effect, so aren't necessary. If antibiotics are needed to treat a bacterial infection during pregnancy, such as cystitis, several antibiotics are known to be safe, including penicillin-based drugs. For thrush, your GP will prescribe a vaginal anti-fungal pessary, but oral medication should be avoided. The best advice is to avoid all medications wherever possible during pregnancy. It is important to remember that this also applies to herbal remedies or supplements from health food shops. In this situation 'natural' does not necessarily mean 'healthy'. These substances are not regulated and little is known about their safety during pregnancy. Doctors only prescribe medication during pregnancy if the benefits to the mother clearly outweigh any possible risk to the baby. Remember to tell your GP before he or she issues a prescription, if there is any possibility that you may be pregnant. For more information please visit the NHS website at www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk.

What way should I toilet train my child?

There is a very broad age spectrum of when children are out of nappies and these days it really doesn't matter if your child is not 'dry' before 3 years. It is up to you and your child to decide when to start toilet-training. However, the actual transition from nappies to pants can be traumatic for a child and it is important you do not become impatient with your child. Many nurseries and playgroups insist your child is dry during the day before he is offered a place, although some daycare nurseries are more flexible. It is now known that babies are unable to control their bowel and bladder before 18 to 24 months, and often it can be much later. "It is not neurologically possible for a child to make the connection between having a full bladder and going to the toilet until he is about 2 years," says Mary Slevin, professional adviser at the Community Practitioners and Health Visitors Association. "Children under 2 years lack the maturity in their nervous systems. Having said that, it is possible to induce a reflex action by sitting a child on a cold potty". These days the common view is very much that we should take our lead from our child as to when to begin potty training. Some signs that your child may be ready for potty training are that: He takes increasing interest in your going to the toilet and indicates in some way that he understands what you are doing by pointing to his nappy. He removes his nappy himself. He has a dry nappy immediately after his daytime nap. He appears to indicate wanting to sit on the potty and uses it appropriately. When he reaches this stage, if the weather is warm you could try leaving him without a nappy for his daytime nap (but remember to use a waterproof sheet) or during a quiet afternoon when you are not out and about. If, as is most likely for the first few days or weeks, he has an 'accident', don't make a fuss, just take him to the potty and let him sit on it for a while so he can make a connection. It might be an idea to buy a few potties and have one in the bathroom, one downstairs and one in the garden. If your child can see these potties everywhere, and knows when they should be used, he may be more inclined to actually make use of them. Most children are able to control their bowels before their bladders so if he has a bowel movement at a certain time of day or starts his routine of grunting and facial grimaces which tell you what is about to happen, try to pre-empt him by sitting him on the potty. Above all, do not get cross, even if he has accidents when using the potty. It's not his fault. If he does manage to use the potty, reward him with hugs and smiles. He will soon get the message. If, when he first starts going nappy-less you have days of problems, then perhaps you have started too early. Take a break of a few weeks, then try again. It may seem like it is taking forever, but bear in mind that they all get there finally. Control over the bladder is much more problematic and even four-year-olds who have been without nappies for years still have the odd mishap, especially if they are involved in something exciting that they don't want to leave. Always take a spare pair (or three!) of pants and trousers with when going out. Relapses in toddlers who have been dry for several months are also common, particularly if they have just had a traumatic experience, such as the birth of a baby brother or sister, or started at nursery. It is important not to revert to nappies, but continue with a bag-full of spare pants and a reward for the times he is dry; things will right themselves eventually. The final hurdle in this long drawn-out process is being dry at night. It is not unusual for children to still be in night-time trainer pants by their fifth birthday. In fact some children seem perfectly happy to be dry all day but go to bed in a trainer nappy. Again, take your time and wait until he seems to be in a settled, happy patch. Suggest he tries going to bed without his trainer and see how he reacts. Many parents start off efforts at night-time dryness by taking their child to the loo last thing at night when they themselves go to bed. This is a useful stop-gap but shouldn't be practised too long or he will never learn to get out of bed to do it himself. Once he seems to have mastered the art of getting out of bed and going straight to the loo first thing in the morning, rather than wait for you to remind him, then you can drop the night-time wakings. Try to be patient with your child, and not to make a fuss. He will eventually succeed in being dry; it is just a matter of time.

How long will I have to stay in hospital after the birth?

If you have had a normal delivery and you and the baby are well you may be able to go home after a few hours or the same day. If you have had a caesarean, any complications, or the baby needs monitoring you may need to stay a few days. Once you are home the community midwives will visit you regularly to check on your progress.

Is there anything I can do to prevent stretchmarks?

Stretchmarks tend to be congenital and no cream will ever prevent or get rid of them. However I do believe it's important to use a rich cream to nourish and hydrate the skin during pregnancy. Look for one that has mostly natural ingredients and is safe for use during pregnancy.

What should I eat during my pregnancy?

In the early days of pregnancy a lot of women feel they're not eating as well as they did before they conceived. It's vital to include enough protein (for example, lean meat, fish, eggs, nuts and tofu) in your diet, as this is important for your baby's growth and development. Eat healthy snacks such as oat biscuits, seeds, hummus, dried apricots, figs and live yogurt, and avoid sugary, refined and processed foods. You don't need to increase your daily calorie requirements until the second and third trimesters when you need to include an extra 200-300 calories per day. (If you are pregnant with twins this should be an additional 600 calories per day.) Try to choose organic food wherever possible, and cut out salt, caffeinated drinks and alcohol. If you're concerned about your diet get advice from your GP or midwife.

How can I cope with lack of sleep?

Before giving birth you may hear about 'dream' babies, who sleep like an angel and only wake up to feed before drifting off again. Of course some new babies do this, but the norm is something quite different. As a result after giving birth, you will have far less sleep than you are used to. It is quite likely that after the first few days you will be up all hours, pacing the room, rocking, jiggling, dancing in time to Mozart, crooning - anything to get your new baby to settle to sleep. Do not panic. This sort of behaviour is perfectly normal and by the time your baby is 3 months old, he will probably be settled and sleeping mainly at night, although still waking for feeds. 'Adjusting to life outside the warm comforts of the womb he has known all his life inevitably takes time,' says Stephanie Snow, spokesperson for Serene, the organisation for new parents which runs the Cry-sis helpline, 'Most babies settle by the time they are 6 months old, or earlier.' But first you have to survive those first turbulent weeks. The two main points to remember are: Sleep when the baby sleeps - try not to rush around too much. Most babies sleep best during the morning, becoming more and more fractious towards evening, so try and schedule visits from doting relations and friends in the afternoon. Help your baby to learn the difference between night and day. Babies are not born with a proper internal clock. When he wakes for feeds in the day, take time to play with him, show him brightly coloured toys, and talk gently to him. When he wakes at night, try to be silent. Unless he has a dirty nappy, there is no need to change him - keep all actions to an absolute minimum and keep the room dark. The safest place for your baby to sleep is in a cot in your room for the first 6 months. Do not share a bed with your baby if you are a smoker, have been drinking alcohol or are taking drugs of any kind, studies have suggested that it is best not to have your baby sleeping in your bed. Although, it is fine to bring your baby into bed for a cuddle or a feed. If your baby is particularly restless and fitful, especially during the early evening and early part of the night, then he may have colic. Babies with colic may suddenly drawing up their legs, wriggling as if in extreme discomfort, and cry - sometimes for what seems like a long time. It is believed that colic could be caused by your baby's immature digestive system, which is unable to cope with this new way of getting food - through the mouth rather than via the umbilical cord. Colic usually affects the baby in the evening and at night - just when you are on your last legs - but try to make sure that the baby is winded properly after feeding to minimise the problem from occurring. Most colicky babies have settled by 3 months old. For more information and advice, talk to your health visitor or visit your local sleep clinic, which is usually run through the health visiting system at your local GP surgery. The first few months can be very tiring for new parents, but remember that most babies will be sleeping through the night and only waking for feeds by 3 months old. Sleep when you can to keep your energy levels up, and enjoy this time with your new baby as you get to know each other.

What is the safest way for my baby to sleep?

The safest way for your baby to sleep is on their back. Babies who sleep on their back are safer and healthier. It is not safe for babies to sleep on their front or side. Babies settle more easily on their back if they have been placed to sleep that way from the very first day. If your baby is less than six months old and you find them asleep on their tummy, gently turn them onto their back. Don't feel you need to keep getting up all night to check on this. After this age, babies can usually roll onto their back themselves so leave them to find their own position. Whatever your baby's age, always place them to sleep on their back.

What is the best way to cope with morning sickness?

It's very important to keep blood sugar levels stable, so frequent, small, healthy meals throughout the day which contain both protein and carbohydrates, rather than three large ones. In some cases morning sickness may be caused by nutritional deficiencies. Make sure you include foods that contain good levels of B6 and zinc in your diet by upping your intake of dairy products, dark green leafy vegetables and yeast extract, lean meats, wholegrain cereals, canned sardines and eggs. Try to rest as much as possible, avoid fatty or spicy foods and drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Sometimes sipping ginger tea can help, and acupuncture can be useful (contact the British Acupuncture Council www.acupuncture.org.uk for a reliable practitioner).

Where can I find expert help and advice?

You can find all your Baby & pregnancy advice from our Baby and Me Club and gurgle.com.

How will I know when it is time to go to hospital?

Unless you're given special instructions by your midwife or doctor, or you're less than 37 weeks pregnant when you go into labour, there is usually no rush. Most people don't deliver in the car park like they do on TV! As a guide, if it's your first baby, head for hospital when you're contracting every five minutes and each contraction lasts more than 30 seconds. Second babies tend to be quicker, so head in when you're contracting every 10 minutes for 30 seconds or more. Whenever your waters break do go in as the midwives will need to check the baby is happy. If you are ever not sure what to do or if you are worried, call the labour ward for advice.

Do you have any advice on car seat safety?

Car seat safety is paramount to us and we have a quick guide on our Baby and Me Club. Click here to view the advice and don't forget that we offer a free safe fit* service in selected stores. *The free fitting service is offered on any car seat purchased from a Mothercare store or www.mothercare.com. Please provide your receipt as proof of purchase to receive this service.

What can I do about sore, cracked nipples?

The first thing you need to do is seek help to support you with positioning and attaching your baby at the breast. Sore and cracked nipples are almost always due to incorrect positioning and attachment. Once this is sorted out your nipples should heal fairly quickly. Air-dry them by going topless when possible. Steer clear of perfumed soaps, which can interfere with your body's natural response. The Montgomery's tubercles (the bumps around the areola) produce a natural antibacterial and anti-viral substance that lubricates and protects your nipple and areola during pregnancy and feeding. Soaps and nipple creams can interfere with this and also may make the areola slippery affecting attachment of your baby to the breast. If your nipples are cracked or bleeding and have become scabbed, then a light smear of Lansinoh nipple cream to the affected area will keep the scab soft and stop it cracking and bleeding. This will reduce your pain and assist healing.

What are the syptoms of colic?

The main symptom is crying, which you are unable to calm, no matter what you try. It often happens at the same time of day - typically the evening - when you may be at your lowest ebb after a busy day. Some babies also seem to have pain, pulling their legs up to their stomach or arching their back. Colic usually starts at about three weeks of age, and as a rule disappears by three or four months.

Do you have any advice on choosing a pushchair?

You'll find expert advice in our Baby and Me section on choosing a pushchair. Click here to see our handy selector.

How do I manage my toddler's tantrums?

Dealing with a tantrum is easier said then done. The child is frustrated and angry, and you may also be caught up in the emotion of the moment, however hard you try not to be. You may want to do anything to stop the tantrum. You may feel embarrassed and ashamed about the tantrum and feel that it is somehow a reflection of you as a parent; try to keep a cool head. You cannot reason with a child in a tantrum, there is no point in attempting any kind of discussion until it is all over. Do your best to keep your emotions out of it. If you get angry it will only feed the spiral of emotions and make things worse. Some parents find it helpful to deliberately 'go robotic' to keep their own feelings in check. It might be a good idea to say that you are leaving the room or that you will walk away. Then go somewhere you can see your child, but your child can't see you; usually, without an audience, your child will stop screaming Try to develop a thick skin. Do what you need to do and ignore the attention of other people, if they are rude enough to stare. Make an effort to hug the child and talk soothingly into his ears; they can often frighten themselves by the sheer strength of their own emotions. Reassure the child, acknowledging how they are feeling ('you must be feeling very cross', 'I can see that you are very angry'). If appropriate you can pick up your child when in a tantrum and take them away from any attention. Don't smack. It does not help and only increases the level of violence and emotion in the situation. Remember, children learn by copying! It is best not to give in to the tantrum. If the child learns you change your mind if they have a tantrum, they will use the power of a tantrum to get their own way. If you feel you are not coping well with a tantrum, make sure your child is safe and call a friend to talk it over. A rational friend who is not caught up in the situation can help you see things in perspective.

Do you have any advice on nappies?

For a wealth of information taking you through pregnancy, including breastfeeding, and up to your child's second birthday, please have a look at the information in our Baby and Me Club. You can find advice about nappies here. You can also join the Baby and Me Club; giving you access to offers, advice and information as your baby grows and access to special in store events and great offers by clicking here.

What is a 'show'?

A �show' is a plug of mucus which forms soon after you become pregnant and usually sits inside the cervix, acting as a barrier. Towards the end of your pregnancy the cervix may start to open a little and move around, this means you can lose little bits of the mucus and you may notice them in your knickers or when you wipe yourself after going to the loo. It looks like jelly and can often have streaks of blood in it. Unfortunately it isn't a sign that you are about to go into labour and you may even see it two weeks before the baby is born. Some women don't see any at all until they are in labour. If you do see a show and are less than 37 weeks you should call the labour ward for advice, otherwise they don't need to know. As at any other time, if you see bright red blood you must go to the hospital.

Is my baby teething?

Although some babies' teeth pop through with no trouble at all, others suffer rather more. The gum may be red and sore, occasionally your baby's cheek may be red, he may dribble more than usual, and he may be irritable. Some mums also say diarrhoea and nappy rash are symptoms, but experts say this is unlikely to be caused by teething. In fact, if your baby seems very fretful or feverish, be careful not to automatically assume it's teething, just in case your baby is ill. Teeth usually erupt in a basic order - so look out for the two centre incisors on the bottom, followed by the two centre teeth on the top. Although they can look alarming, don't worry about breastfeeding when the teeth arrive - those middle lower teeth are covered by your baby's tongue so you won't get nipped.

Do you have any advice on clothing for newborns?

For a wealth of information taking you through pregnancy, including breastfeeding, and up to your child's second birthday, please have a look at the information in our Baby and Me Club. You can find information on cloth for newborns here. You can also join the Baby and Me Club; giving you access to offers, advice and information as your baby grows and access to special in store events and great offers by clicking here.

Do you have any advice on bottle-feeding?

For a wealth of information taking you through pregnancy, including breastfeeding, and up to your child's second birthday, please have a look at the information in our Baby and Me Club. You will find a section containing advice about bottle feeding here. You can also join the Baby and Me Club; giving you access to offers, advice and information as your baby grows and access to special in store events and great offers by clicking here.

How can I prevent nappy rash?

The secret of preventing nappy rash lies in keeping your baby's bottom as dry as possible. This means changing their nappies when they are wet or soiled. This may be a lot more often than you think - as often as every hour in newborn babies. Change the nappy before putting your baby down after a feed, or to sleep. It is also important to keep your baby's bottom as clean as possible. If the nappy is soiled, use the nappy to remove the worst of it, then wash with warm water and a gentle soap, using cotton wool. Alternatively, use gentle baby wipes. Whenever possible, allow your baby to lie in a warm environment without a nappy for a while before putting on another one.

Have I got post-natal depression?

However much you love your baby, becoming a mum can be tough. Sleepless nights, 24-hour babycare and a huge plummet in hormones can take their toll, leaving you sad and dejected. Feeling down can take many forms, from brief baby blues, to mild but longer-lasting feelings of gloom, clinical postnatal depression or - at worst - puerperal psychosis.

Do you have any advice for expectant mums?

For a wealth of information taking you through pregnancy, including breastfeeding, and up to your child's second birthday, please have a look at the information in our Baby and Me Club. You can also join the Baby and Me Club; giving you access to offers, advice and information as your baby grows and access to special in store events and great offers by clicking here.

What are the symptoms of meningitis?

By knowing the symptoms of meningitis and septicaemia, you can help ensure your baby gets prompt medical treatment if he does get the disease. Symptoms to watch out for include: A high temperature Vomiting Refusing to feed Diarrhoea Cold hands and feet Blotchy skin which may become paler or turn blue Not liking to be picked up and giving a high, moaning cry A stiff body or being limp and floppy Being very sleepy or so sleepy that you cannot wake him A vacant, staring expression Difficulty breathing or breathing faster than normal Extreme shivering A rash of small red, spots or purple bruises on the body. A tense or bulging soft spot on the head One thing that makes meningitis and septicaemia hard to spot is that your baby may well have only a few of these symptoms. Some babies, for instance, will be alert, but may be shivering and have cold hands and feet. Symptoms can appear in any order, but the first symptoms are usually fever, vomiting, headache and feeling unwell, just like many mild illnesses. The early warning symptoms - those that Meningitis Research Foundation calls �red flag symptoms' - are: Freezing hands and feet Pale, mottled skin Limb pain These symptoms appear 5-8 hours before more serious symptoms like rashes, severe sleepiness and bulging soft spot. If they are picked up then, your child can be treated much earlier, giving him a better chance of making a good recovery.

Do you have any advice on breastfeeding?

For a wealth of information taking you through pregnancy, including breastfeeding, and up to your child's second birthday, please have a look at the information in our Baby and Me Club. You can also join the Baby and Me Club; giving you access to offers, advice and information as your baby grows and access to special in store events and great offers by clicking here.

How can I beat tiredness?

Tiredness can be a particular problem in the first trimester, when you may feel unbelievably tired and sleepy. Caused by pregnancy hormones, fatigue is often worse for women who are overweight, who are pregnant with more than one child, or who already have other children to look after. However, feeling very tired and washed out may also be a sign that you have anaemia or another underlying condition - so do go and see your GP if you are worried. The best solution is to rest as much as possible, though this is often easier said than done. Make sure that you are eating well. Small, frequent meals will keep your blood sugar levels up. Try to include plenty of iron-rich foods such as lean red meat and green leafy vegetables in your diet. Plenty of complex carbohydrates such as wholemeal bread, brown rice or pasta will give you energy. A good pregnancy multi vitamin and mineral supplement may help. Cut out caffeine, drinks with artificial sweeteners, and highly processed or refined foods as they may cause sleep problems.

What are the symptoms of asthma?

Children who have asthma usually have one or more of the following symptoms: Coughing, particularly at night and after exercise A whistling noise in their chest - this is wheezing Breathlessness, or having to stop to catch their breath frequently If your child has one or more of these symptoms you should take them to see your GP. However, it is actually difficult in very young children to tell whether they have asthma. One of the tests used to tell whether an adult's lungs are working properly - the peak flow meter - does not work well in children under the age of six. If your child's symptoms are mild, your doctor may ask you to keep a diary of what symptoms he has and when they happen to help decide if it is asthma. If the symptoms affect what your child is able to do your doctor may start them on a course of treatment for a trial period and see if this helps relieve the symptoms.

Are there any risks from MMR vaccination?

The media have been quick to remark on individual cases and research where vaccination allegedly causes serious side-effects. But it is important to remember that the dangers of the diseases prevented by vaccination are many times greater than the dangers of vaccines, which are now extremely safe. Recent reports suggested a link between MMR vaccination and inflammatory bowel disease and autism (a condition in which sufferers become withdrawn and uncommunicative). Government experts and scientists from UK and other countries have found no proof of any risk. They have reassured parents that MMR use, as recommended, is the safest way to protect your child against measles, mumps and rubella. Studying millions of children vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella has shown no evidence that vaccination causes either autism or bowel disease.

What should I name my baby?

Giving your baby a name is the first important step of that child's life, and it's one of the most exciting - and useful - things you can actually prepare for before it's born. It's not a task to be taken lightly. Click here to view our guide to naming your baby.

What are my childcare choices?

Before you decide what sort of childcare will suit you best, go through all the options. If your parents are still young, they might like to get involved - it's cheaper and often more reassuring if granny is looking after your one and only. A few big employers, such as hospitals and government offices, offer workplace cr�ches, which are good value for money and have the added benefit of enabling you to pop down to see your child during your lunch break. Childminders and daycare nurseries are cheaper than nannies but may not offer your child one-to-one care, which you may feel your baby needs, particularly when so small. Once you have decided what childcare arrangements you are going to use, you could spend time with the new carer before you have to leave for work so you get used to another person looking after your baby. You could leave the baby for an hour or so with the new carer while you go to get your hair cut, go shopping or pamper yourself by having a massage or a beauty treatment. Above all, don't feel guilty. Remember that few things in life are perfect, whether you stay at home full-time or go out to work. But many mothers do go out to work because they share the financial responsibility of running the home with their partner and for other reasons; social contact, mental stimulation, career and whether a woman wants to be with her children all the time. Many women find the whole subject confusing and fraught with anxiety. If you talk about your feelings with your partner or a trusted friend, things may become a little clearer so you can feel confident about your decision.

What is the correct temperature for my baby's nursery?

Room temperature is vital in creating a safe sleeping environment for baby and should be maintained at 16-20�C to help reduce the risk of cot death. How much bedding to use The amount of bedding you use depends on room temperature. However, the rule of thumb is a vest, a bodysuit, plus one sheet and up to three thin blankets. 24�C/75�F - 1 sheet only 21�C/70�F - 1 sheet plus 1 layer of blanket 18�C/65�F - 1 sheet plus 2 layers of blanket 15�C/60�F - 1 sheet plus 3 layers of blanket (Note: A blanket doubled over counts as two layers) For more information on completing your nursery and safe sleeping for your baby please click here for our useful information buying and safety guides.

From what age or weight can I use a booster cushion?

The age of your child is not important - it is their weight which matters when choosing a car seat. Booster seats are suitable from 15-36kg / 33-79lbs which is approximately 4-11yrs of age. Booster seat / cushions are designed for use with the adult seat belt in your car. Remember, if your child is less than 135cm in height or younger than 12 years old they must travel in an appropriate child restraint by law. For more information please click here to view our car safety buyers guides. If you have any doubts, please pop into your local store for help and advice.

How do I descale my steriliser, bottle warmer, kettle or humidifier?

Limescale is a white, chalky deposit found primarily in products heating water such as sterilisers, bottle warmers, humidifiers, kettles etc. Regular descaling will ensure efficiency as well as prolong the life of your product. It should be done at least every four weeks or earlier if the products is used heavily or in hard water areas.. Do not use abrasive materials, they will damage the unit. Using descaling sachets: please follow manufacturer�s instructions. Using citric acid (available from chemist shops): mix 5g of citric acid with 100mL of water and pour in the steriliser. Run for one cycle. Leave to stand for 30 minutes. Pour out, rinse and wipe dry. Caution avoid contact with eyes as the acid may cause irritation, keep out of the reach of children Using vinegar: pour a mixture 40mL of vinegar (any type) and 40mL of water in the unit. Run for one cycle, leave to stand for 30 minutes. If any limescale remains run a second cycle and leave to stand for a 30 minutes. Pour out, rinse and wipe dry. Descaling using vinegar is cheaper but it is also a little smelly.

How much bedding should I use for my baby?

The amount of bedding you use depends on room temperature. However, the rule of thumb is a vest, a bodysuit, plus one sheet and up to three thin blankets. 24�C/75�F - 1 sheet only 21�C/70�F - 1 sheet plus 1 layer of blanket 18�C/65�F - 1 sheet plus 2 layers of blanket 15�C/60�F - 1 sheet plus 3 layers of blanket Note: A blanket doubled over counts as two layers.

What do I need to pack in my hospital bag?

Use our helpful hospital bag checklist to ensure you have everything you need for your hospital bag.

When can my baby use a cot, and how long for?

All of our cots are suitable from birth up to approx 24 months. Please remember to use the feet to foot rule when you put your baby to sleep for as long as possible, see the example below. Feet to foot position Place your baby with their feet to the foot of the cot, with the bedclothes firmly tucked in and no higher than their shoulders, so they can't wriggle down under the covers. Don't worry if they wriggle up and get uncovered.

What size clothes should I buy for my baby?

See our clothing size guide for babies and children here.

How long can I use a Moses basket for?

Moses baskets and cribs are only appropriate for newborns and should only be used until your baby is around three to four months old. View our online range here.

When can my child use a pillow and duvet?

Mothercare does not recommend duvets, quilts or pillows for babies under 12 months.

What sort of mattress do I need?

Every new baby deserves a new mattress as the interior of an already used mattress may have been permanently compressed by the previous baby's weight, making it less comfortable and less effective. What kinds of mattresses are available? Pocket sprung mattress - individual steel springs sewn into small fabric pockets. Each spring is free to independently respond to the contours of the body, providing superior support for your babies head, neck and back. Spring interior mattress - sturdy, coiled springs offering firm support. Foam interior mattress - a core of foam encased in a wipeable, waterpoof non-PVC cover, providing good support and comfort. View our full guide to mattresses here.

What is the current law on car seats?

Every child MUST travel in the appropriate child restraint until that child reaches EITHER 135cm in height OR 12 years old. The Department of Transport estimate that these changes could prevent over 2000 child deaths or serious injuries every year. All parents, carers and guardians must therefore ensure that they have the correct car seat for their children or risk a fine of up to �500.

How can I reduce the risk of cot death?

Advice for parents to reduce the risk of cot death: Cut smoking in pregnancy - fathers too! And don't let anyone smoke in the same room as your baby. Place your baby on the back to sleep (and not on the front or side). Do not let your baby get too hot, and keep your baby's head uncovered. Place your baby with their feet to the foot of the cot, to prevent them wriggling down under the covers. Never sleep with your baby on a sofa or armchair. The safest place for your baby to sleep is in a crib or cot in a room with you for the first six months. It's especially dangerous for your baby to sleep in your bed if you (or your partner): are a smoker, even if you never smoke in bed or at home, have been drinking alcohol, take medication or drugs that make you drowsy, feel very tired; or if your baby: was born before 37 weeks, weighed less than 2.5kg or 5� lbs at birth, is less than three months old. Don't forget, accidents can happen: you might roll over in your sleep and suffocate your baby; or your baby could get caught between the wall and the bed, or could roll out of an adult bed and be injured. Settling your baby to sleep (day and night) with a dummy can reduce the risk of cot death, even if the dummy falls out while your baby is asleep. Breastfeed your baby. Establish breastfeeding before starting to use a dummy.

Do you have any advice for regarding sleep positioners?

Advice for using Sleep Positioners 1. Once the baby is able to roll over freely and starts to move around during sleep, positioners should no longer be used. 2. Do not use for infants under 6lbs/2.7kgs. 3. Only use the sleep positioner in a cot on a flat surface. 4. Always put your baby to sleep on their back, rather than on their front or side. 5. Do not dismantle the product in anyway; the positioner should only be used as per the instructions.

Where can I find support pillows and cushions?

You can find our online range of support and feeding pillows and cushions here.

From what age can I use a forward facing car seat?

The age of your child is not important - it is their weight which matters when choosing a car seat. Forward facing car seats are suitable from 9kg/20lbs to approximately 18kg/40lbs.

Which pushchair is right for me?

There are many things you need to consider when choosing a pushchair - such as the age of your baby, your available storage space and of course your budget. Travel Systems are suitable from birth and designed to be used with an infant carier that lifts easily out of the car and slots into the frame. However, if you are planning to go out and about for any period of time, always use the pushchair, pram, or carry cot mode. Strollers are practical and lightweight, they're perfect for holidays and days out and for people who use public transport a lot. They fold down compactly for easy storage, too. Doubles and Tandems provide comfy rides for two. Doubles sit siblings side by side and some are suitable from birth, while tandems sit one in front of the other (usually with one seat suitable from birth and the second from 6 months. 3 Wheelers are perfect if you'll be putting in a lot of pushchair mileage, whether it's around town or over rough terrain. They're easy to steer but make sure you've got the boot space! For more in-depth information and help choosing the right pushchair. Click here for our pushchair buyers guides.

Important information regarding Maclaren strollers

Important information regarding Maclaren strollers Product safety is our highest priority at Mothercare and all products sold by us, including Maclaren buggies, comply with British or European safety standards where appropriate. To ensure our customers have all the information available on this subject, we are providing in stores and online the guidelines Maclaren have issued for the safe folding of all their buggies. Here are the basic guidelines as supplied by Maclaren. The guidelines are listed on the Maclaren website www.maclarenbaby.com or can be found in your instruction manual. Keep children clear of the stroller during opening and folding. Always use the safety harness. Always apply the brakes when stationary. Never leave your child unattended - even with the harness fastened. Don't overload the buggy. Heavy items hanging from the handles can cause it to topple over. Don't let children play or climb on a stroller and don't carry a second child on a stroller designed for one child. Negotiate curbs carefully. Wherever possible always carry a stroller down flights of stairs. Statement from Maclaren: Maclaren Buggy Safety Update May 2011 In November 2009, Maclaren made available free of charge hinge covers for all Maclaren umbrella fold buggies for those customers who requested them. The cover is not required for the safe use of the buggy, but is an additional safety measure in respect of the operation of opening or closing the stroller. The patented design right to this safety enhancement was waived by Maclaren allowing other manufacturers, with similar style side hinge mechanisms, to supply the same measure to their customers. The old style side hinge design continues to be widely used by many manufacturers whose products pose an inherent risk of finger entrapment; no different to the hazards associated with any goods containing moving parts. Maclaren have adopted a leadership position in addressing the wider safety issues that surround the industry at present and will continue to do so. Maclaren continues to place safety as the top priority and have eliminated the risk of hinge related injuries for all buggies manufactured after May 2010. These products feature an enclosed side hinge mechanism with no entrapment points. Consumers should continue to take care in operating any stroller or product with moving parts in line with the product�s safety instructions. This update is intended to be a timely reminder, nearly 18 months after the initial announcement, for users to ensure that children are kept away from the buggy during the opening and closing process. Under no circumstances should it be erected when the child is seated in the buggy itself. Maclaren wishes to remind consumers that hinge covers are still available. Maclaren will continue to offer these free of charge on request to any customers.

What is the depth of your Mattresses?

The depth of our Mattresses are: One Piece foam - 8cm Coolmax Foam interior - 10cm Natural Mattress - 10cm Luxury Quilted - 10cm Spring interior quilted - 14cm Coolmax Spring interior - 14cm Amicor Spring interior - 14cm Pocket Sprung -?15cm Tufted Pocket Sprung - 15cm Moses Basket / Pram / Crib sizes are all 3.5cm depth 2ft6 and 3ft single bed mattresses are 14-15cm depth Please click here to see our guide to choosing the right mattress for your baby.

What clothing will I need for my new baby?

Knowing what clothes your baby will need in the first few weeks can seem like a daunting task. You will need more than you think because most babies bring up a little milk after feeding, and you may need to make numerous nappy changes, so it's a good idea to have plenty of spares so you're not worrying about keeping up with the washing. Your new baby will need; 6-8 sleepsuits 6-8 bodysuits or vests 2 wrap over vests 3 cardigans 2 cotton hats 1 warm jacket or pram suit 2 pairs of scratch mitts 6 pairs of socks 1 blanket or shawl 6 bibs For more information, click here

How do I babyproof my home?

Take a look around your house and try to see it from your baby's level; it will help you to see all those hidden hazards. When planning to install safety precautions, it is best to do it before it becomes crucial. For example, fit a safety gate when your baby shows signs of crawling, rather than waiting until they can move quickly. Living room Easy to fit anti-slam doorstops prevent little fingers from getting trapped in doors. A video guard will keep hands and other objects out of the cassette slot while still allowing you to use the remote control. Socket covers keep plug sockets safe from probing little fingers. Corner cushions cover the sharp corners of low tables and are particularly important when your baby is first learning to walk. Fireguards allow you to attend to the fire while keeping children from burning themselves. Window catches lock a window in an open position for ventilation but prevent children from opening them any further. Glass safety film is great for glazed doors and French windows. If the glass does get smashed, the film holds the broken pieces together. It can also be used on glass coffee tables. Bedroom Drawer and cupboard catches keep children away from precious, breakable and dangerous items. A bed guard will prevent your toddler from falling out in the night. They fold up neatly, making them easy to take on holidays. Kitchen A catch on the fridge and freezer will prevent that pint of milk or those frozen peas from being poured over the floor. A cooker and hob guard is a must have to protect toddlers from hot pans and surfaces. Multi-purpose locks secure all appliances. Cupboard catches should be used on all cupboards containing breakables or potentially dangerous items, like cleaning fluids. Bathroom A non slip bathmat will help prevent slipping and make you and your baby or toddler feel more safe and confident during bath time. Close the lavatory seat firmly with a multi-purpose lock. Hall A safety gate, fitted as soon as your baby can crawl, will stop tumbles down the stairs. They can also be used to keep children out of the kitchen or the garden. Safety first Children's skin is more delicate than adults. Prevent scalding from hot taps by turning your thermostat down to below 54 degrees C (130 degrees F). Never leave your child alone near water, not even for a minute. A child can drown in just a few centimetres of water. Don't leave even a small baby unattended on a bed. You never know exactly when they'll roll over for the first time. Buy a kettle with a curly safety lead. Turn pan handles inwards and use the back burners whenever you can. Fit a smoke alarm on each floor. View our online range of safety essentials here

What sort of gates should I get?

You will need at least 2 gates, one for the top of the stairs and one for the bottom. You may also require more gates to go across doorways. There are two main options, fixed gates that are screwed into the walls, or pressure fit gates which are portable. Always ensure that any gates you have on the stairs do not have a trip bar at the bottom as this could cause accidents. Click here to view our online range

What is Swaddling?

Swaddling is the practice of wrapping babies in swaddling cloths, large muslins, lightweight blankets or cotton sheets. Swaddling keeps a baby's arms close to their body and legs snuggled together, which may help your baby to sleep soundly and securely by recreating the comfort and snugness of the womb. tips and advice choose lightweight fabrics for good air circulation, ideally soft and stretchy to wrap around baby's body. regularly check your baby is in the correct sleeping position, on their back. swaddling can help relieve symptoms of colic by providing gentle, even pressure around the abdomen. swaddling may also help with positioning your baby for breastfeeding by tucking away wriggling little hands and arms. please remember swaddling is only intended for use with young babies. do not allow your baby to get too warm � regularly check your baby's temperature. babies should not be swaddled at every sleep or nap time. To make sure swaddling is practiced safely, it is best to follow the advice on this page. For diagrams and pictures please click this link. how to swaddle 1. place baby as shown with their shoulders lined up with straight edge of the blanket. 2. firmly pull one side of the swaddling blanket around the baby and tuck it under baby's arm and body 3. firmly pull the last side of the blanket around baby and tuck underneath. please remember... swaddling is only recommended for the first 3-4 months. your baby will need to wear just a bodysuit (and sometimes a sleepsuit) underneath the swaddling sheet or blanket. But this will depend on the time of year (and the room temperature). make sure the sheet or blanket is no higher than your baby's shoulders. your baby's head should never be covered with the swaddling blanket, and needs to be clearly visible. heavy blankets should not be used for swaddling due to the risk of overheating we recommend using a room thermometer, the ideal room temperature for babies is between 16-20 centigrade. you should look and feel your baby regularly when swaddled to make sure they are comfortable and not too warm or too cold. always place your baby to sleep on his or her back. ensure your baby is not swaddled too tightly to restrict breathing, or too loosely so that your baby can move and become entangled in the cloth. it is important a baby can move with no restrictions throughout the day. They need to develop their muscles, which will help them, to crawl and sit in the future This is why babies should not be swaddled at every sleep or nap time.

What sort of highchair should I buy?

There are various highchairs on the market answering different needs. When making your selection make sure highchairs conform to current safety standards. Lightweight folding highchairs Value-for-money, easy to fold metal frames make these ideal for travelling and packing in the back of a car. They fold down to 122 x 56 x 21 cm or 71 x 74 x 35 cm. A lightweight pine version weighs 4.7 kg. They may have a fixed easy-clean tray or a detachable one with three adjustable positions. They have padded wipe-clean PVC seats for extra comfort. Weighs between 5.4 kg - 8 kg. Convertible highchairs These have a long life as they are designed to work as a highchair for your baby before converting into a low chair and table as he/ she becomes a toddler up to the age of around three years old. Low chair seat height from 25 cm - 28 cm. Low table seat height 43 cm - 45 cm. Usually available in sturdy wood - either pine of beech. A shaped wipe - clean cushion can be bought separately. Comes with a crutch strap plus D-strings for securing a safety harness which may be sold separately. Either has a removable wipe clean tray or a detachable wooden one. Overall weight between 10.5 kg - 12 kg Adaptable multi-level folding highchairs Depending on how luxurious the model, it will feature four to seven height adjustments. This allows you to adjust it from a conventional highchair position to table level when your toddler is older. Adjustable three position backrest and footrest for extra comfort Padded wipe-clean seats May be freestanding when folded Frame easily folds flat for storage and travel Seat height from 64 cm down to 29 cm Weighs between 9 kg - 12 kg Safety First While in the highchair your baby should be secured at all times with the harness supplied or an approved harness complying with BS 6684. Highchairs should also conform to BS5799. Never leave your child in the highchair unattended. Do not use the highchair on a slippery or raised surface. When folded it should be kept out of children's reach. Take special care when getting your child in or out of the highchair. View our online range of highchairs here

Do you offer a car seat fitting service?

One of our trained fitting experts will be happy to check that the car seat you buy fits both your child and your car. They will show you how to fit your car seat safely, for free. Once fitted, we will provide you with a comprehensive safety checklist, to make sure your child stays safe on every journey. Contact your local store for further details.

Do I need a baby monitor?

A monitor offers parents peace of mind. As soon as baby stirs, you'll know about it...so you can get on with other things around the house (or even catch up on some sleep yourself). Please remember though monitors are only an aid - they aren't intended to replace adult supervision.

What toys are suitable for what age?

These toys are ideal for the various stages of your baby's first year. From newborn to 6 weeks Your baby will be drawn to high contrast colours and patterns. Cot mobile Play mat and baby gym Baby music tapes/cds From about 3 to 6 months Your baby will begin to be able to roll over, may start to respond to his or her own name, and might be able to find partly hidden objects. Fabric books Rattles Soft cuddly toy From about 6 to 8 months Your little one will be showing greater precision in picking up and grasping objects, may be sitting up with support, and starting to babble and make different sounds. Stacking beakers Wooden blocks Baby mirror Bath toys Small card books Teething rings From 8 to 12 months Your baby will respond to a wide variety of stimuli, might be crawling or even beginning to walk, and may even start to say a few words. Toy telephone Chunky play bricks and people Musical toys Pull along toys Ride on toys (12months) Play it safe Purchase toys from a reputable retailer Ensure toys conform to British Standard BS EN71 Dispose of packaging after opening the toy Keep toys away from fire Watch out for older children playing with toys that have small parts, close to your baby Always use a harness when using swings Put toys away after use to avoid falls, and do not leave toys on the stairs View our online range here.

Can I buy Early Learning Centre toys from Mothercare?

Yes you can. We have a small range of ELC toys on our website and many of our stores now have ELC stores inside. View our online range here or contact your local store for further information.

I saw an outfit in my local store but I cannot find it on the website.

Whilst mothercare.com has the widest range of pushchairs and car seats, we do not range all the clothing that you will see in store. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Stratford Cot Bed

As part of Cosatto's ongoing review of this safety issue, they have taken the decision to extend the publication of the Product Safety Notice in an effort to contact as many owners as possible. Please click here to view the original safety notice.

If an item is 'website exclusive', can I still order this in store?

Yes. Even if an item is online as a web exclusive, you can still place an order in store for it to be delivered to your home address.